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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)
, sunny bay area. also i want to thank you, hilary flynn, the director of the irish festival for this invitation. let's celebrate the irish in the americas. i put a title to my conversation with you today, take the journey with me, and i wanted to read you an irish proverb that i like it very much because it's the way the history of myself, the history of my family. the longest road out is the shortest road home. and so travel with me and let's go to havana, cuba, and to know a little bit about the irish, the few irish that went to cuba, in particular to havana. i want you to know that on the left side of the entrance to the havana harbor, there is a well-known fortress, el moro. there is a lighthouse there and the moro has become a image of cuban nationality and in particular havana. in that lighthouse you find, you read an -- when you enter the havana harbor, you find an irish name. that lighthouse was known for many years as the odono lighthouse. who was this person, odono the man that oversaw the project of the lighthouse in 1844 and he was a governor of cuba from 1843 to
an -- when you enter the havana harbor, you find an irish name. that lighthouse was known for many years as the odono lighthouse. who was this person, odono the man that oversaw the project of the lighthouse in 1844 and he was a governor of cuba from 1843 to 48, but he was a spanish man of irish origin and irish ancestry, a descendant of the -- chieftan of the ticanelles. he is spanish and irish together. if we look at the history of the irish in cuba, most of the irish to went to cuba in the 18th and 19th centuries arrived from spain, some of them with the spanish royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to f
descendant of the -- chieftan of the ticanelles. he is spanish and irish together. if we look at the history of the irish in cuba, most of the irish to went to cuba in the 18th and 19th centuries arrived from spain, some of them with the spanish royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because
to the way the irish pronounce murphy. i said, that's amazing. did you marry a serviceman from the -- military person who came to puerto rico. no, the family has been here since the 18th century. and i said, really? so we began tracing -- we still haven't found the actual person, but evidently it was an irish conscript in the irish navy that came to puerto rico. puerto rico was owned by britain, as they liked to do with their colonies, and efficient evidently the sailor came there and said palm trees, warm weather, and look at the girls. and he remained. that's the end of the second part. the third part is in response to the op ed piece that margaret mcpeek wrote in the chronicle and the letters, i don't know if you've read them -- you should pick up -- the letters that a couple of, you know, irish americans wrote in response accusing cousin mcpeek of not having a sense of humor. it has to do with these tee shirts that target has produced for the st. patrick's day parade in which mrs. mcpeek derided the fact that they were making fun of the irish in the united states, you know
, irish americans wrote in response accusing cousin mcpeek of not having a sense of humor. it has to do with these tee shirts that target has produced for the st. patrick's day parade in which mrs. mcpeek derided the fact that they were making fun of the irish in the united states, you know, things like i survived the kelly murphy family gathering, things like that. and they wrote letters poking fun at what i thought was a couragous op ed piece. so this is in response to the irish americans who don't feel the pride that they should. and please excuse if i manhandle the irish manner of speaking. this is a joke told to me by one of my friends. he said that an american, an irish american, was golfing with his wife on a weekend. and he hit the ball into the rough. went looking for it. all of a sudden, a leprechaun jumped up. we're back to the leprechaun theme. he said, top of the morning to you, lad. he says, you're a leprechaun. he says, yes, i am, and you have 3 wishes. three wishes? he says, yes. you have 3 wishes. i want to be a par golfer.. he says, no problem. from now on, par and und
rehabilitated, and irish war veterans have had to wait even longer. >> these guys have seen a lot. philip fought with the british army against nazi germany. he took part in the allied invasion of normandy, a bloody battle that claimed thousands of lives. then he, you know, left ireland to go fight in the war because he just got married. he wanted to make a difference. he still had a wife and seven children. grandchildren as he got older. just what you would want to be as a man, i suppose. >> he wants justice for his grandfather, but time is running out. philip is over 90 years old. he never shows off his medals for bravery. even today, nearly 70 years later, he is afraid of the irish authorities. he deserted the irish army to fight for the british, and he was sent to prison when he returned. the trauma has remained with him. this is the first time his family has let anyone film him. strangers and even more so a video camera make him nervous. >> he is still nervous at this ste. i would want to see an apology, maybe, a thank you, a pardon for the paranoia he has gone through, the suffering wonderi
the story of an irish catholic who is not ashamed of his heritage, but didn't want to be defined by it. of the third-generation immigrant who cares little about the country, who have no desire to visit ireland or to read about it, who considered himself 100% american and couldn't understand why anyone would think of them as less than that. who is a catholic who went to mass every sunday, went to confession and the catholic church in boston as the anchor of his existence and everywhere he went, he would find out what the church was. when he went on vacation in new hampshire, he sent a note to the innkeeper who was a friend of his inside find out for me to confession on friday and also find out if to does in early -- he was right at the time, if tuples and millie are going to be there. they said one sentence. he grew up the son of a very respected businessman edward later in east boston. boston was of course the channel. he was the ultimate insider. he was the ultimate insider and even when he went to harvard because half of this class went to boston and there is about 10% of the student
-and-forth from being an outsider to an insider to an outsider to an insider. i found the story of an irish catholic who wasn't ashamed of his heritage but didn't want to be defined by eight. of a third-generation immigrant who cared little about the country, his grandparents had been born, who had no desire to visit ireland or to read about it, who considered themselves 100% american and couldn't understand why anyone would think of him as less than that, a catholic who went to mass every sunday and went to confession, and the catholic church in boston was the anchor of his existence and everywhere he went, she would find out where the church was. when he went on vacation in new hampshire he sent a note to feet innkeeper who was a friend of his and said find out when they have the confession on friday and also find out if -- he was married at that time, if they are going to be around. this pitfall happy -- in one sentence. he grew up with some of the very respective businessman and board leader in each boston. he was the ultimate insider, and even when he went to harvard because half of hi
and please excuse if i manhandle the irish manner of speaking. this is a joke told to me by one of my friends. he said that an american, an irish american, was golfing with his wife on a weekend. and he hit the ball into the rough. went looking for it. all of a sudden, a leprechaun jumped up. we're back to the leprechaun theme. he said, top of the morning to you, lad. he says, you're a leprechaun. he says, yes, i am, and you have 3 wishes. three wishes? he says, yes. you have 3 wishes. i want to be a par golfer.. he says, no problem. from now on, par and under. he says, i want a porsche. he says, when you go home tonight, there will be a porsche in your garage. and he says, i want a million dollars. he says, done. when you go to the bank on monday, there will be a million dollars in your account. thank you very much, i have to find my ball. so he goes looking -- hold on a minute, lad. please hold on. i see you are golfing with your wife. do you mind if i go into the shrubbery with her for an hour or so? he says, let me ask her. it's a million dollars. so he goes up and asks the
of securities and exchange commission and the maritime commission and the first irish-american to be ambassador for the court of st. james to great britain. he was also the father of the president and attorney general. a senator and the woman who did more for the mentally disabled in this country and this world than anyone else. a woman who will be as well known as her brothers, i think. the youngest to, the ambassador to ireland, jean kennedy smith, who was essential enraging piece. and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in the united states senate. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of the man who spent his life moving back and forth from outsider to insider and back into outsider insider. story of an irish catholic who is not ashamed of his irish heritage, but refused to be defined by it. he was a third generation immigrant. his parents had been born in the united states. his grand parents had come here when they were young people. joseph kennedy cared little about the countries whose grandparents had been born in. he had no desire to visit ireland or read
in the catholic country. irish women have taken to the streets demanding the laws be changed. >> not the church, not the state, women will decide their fate. >> never before have the irish people campaigned so hard for the right to abortion. they are calling for the church and state to stay out of issues related to their bodies. this woman's face can be seen all over posters here. campaigners say what happened to her must never happen again. they are fighting against ireland's strict anti-abortion laws, which they say scared doctors out of giving her an abortion. >> i feel it is a very important issue for women and we're treated as second-class citizens in our country. i feel it is my body and my business and not the business of anybody inside that building to tell me what i can and cannot do. >> it is very important for us to separate church and medical decisions. there is still far too much of a religious influence on things. >> irish women seeking abortion are forced to go abroad. thousands travel to britain for that reason each year. this woman has helped start a publi discussion. she was p
of the republican party. and i do that through the story of my irish catholic working-class family and we have schism in the family between people lucky enough to go to college and the people who went to college tended -- they became democrats and the people who didn't go to college where republicans. this isn't a matter of being smart. it is a matter of who was more energetic. is a matter of privilege. when i was younger i wrote about this, i could make it sound as though it was a matter of intelligence like smart people became democrats. as i got more involved in the book i began to think liberalism could be class privilege for some people too. i became interested in the way republican party peeled off a chunk of my family in the 60s and 70s and made the reagan democrats. first they were nixon democrats, people live who voted for john f. kennedy voted for nixon in 70-72. one of them was my mother. she stopped telling us who she was voting for. said there was a secret ballot. so my father and i knew that meant she probably noted -- voted for nixon. what i saw trying to piece together what hap
and then the irish. they came in fantastic numbers into new york, philadelphia, boston and so on. and albany. albany had so many irish that they couldn't handle it during the famine, and they stopped it. to close our borders and would not let any more people in. they were so many people coming into the city. eventually the irish became dominant in the 19th century in numbers. in 1875 cents as i think showed one in six all iranians was born in ireland. add to this the politics that albany was always a political city, even in dutch colonizati colonization, and in the time of the english, likewise when we have the revolution. waters, schemers, drafters of the constitution gathering in albany, franklin's albany planet union. and so, so it went through the years. one of the great politicians of all time in this state come in this country, was the mayor of albany. he had an interrupted success from the time he was elected 1942 until he died in hospital in 1983, 11 terms uninterrupted, and that's the longest running mayor of any city in the united states, and he was very proud of that. he was part of this
was trace the descendants of mill the knee at's owners who lived in south carolina and georgia, irish-american families. the first lady's family. i tested them and in fact it is the most ordinary of american stories. the white shields and black shields are related. this is on the first lady's mother's side. her mother is marion shields. many americans are making these discoveries with dna testing, just finding these connections through ancestry.com, doing their own genealogy. it is a kind of discovery that many americans are making but it is not an easy one for people. on both sides of the family, this was a hard realization, even though people know these things happen. many members of the first lady's white extended family had no idea their ancestors had known slaves and while many people might like a connection to the white house, this was a most unsettling connection to the white house as you can imagine. it is not something most people expect, to have a reporter not on your door and say one of your ancestors may have owned the first lady's ancestors. and some people simply didn't
field and irish field out there for hurling and irish football. and -- both won the national championship. and both teams from san francisco won this yearly and compete and brought home that trophy right there and last year san francisco had the great opportunity to host this year they went to philadelphia and brought back the trophy and a real tremendous honor for the community and -- if i could just divert for a moment because he is standing here and i'm almost done joe thank you for all of the work you did at p b i and district accept and i don't have a certificate for you but the city is very lucky to have you at d b i but for the two team, the congratulations, the floor is yours. (applause). . >> my name is jared and treasure of -- club my daughter who's going do grab the microphone any second -- our club was found in 1987 and we won seven consecutivive titles in 1970 and then had a 20 year drought and it's like waiting all day to win a title and so now we have won two consecutive title and the first one was contested in 1959 and so the next one is -- [inaudible] and w
. i'm half irish and half jewish. i am the only one who can be put on the israeli border and be shot from both sides. [laughter] i was getting all of the hate mail and warren was not getting any of them. i will broadcast nationwide that you are jewish and i am not. that way you will get all of the hate mail. he said, do not do that. you are much more politically secure than i am. besides, you would make a nice jewish boy. [laughter] let me conclude with what my favorite statements -- with one of my favorite statements. it sums up my feelings about warren. "through our great fortune, in our youth our hearts were touched with fire. it is given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing." do not pretend to undervalue the rewards of ambition. we have seen with our own eyes beyond the goal fields the honor. above all, we have learned that whether a man -- will look downward and dig, the one and only success is to bring to his work a mighty heart." warren rudman was handed a spade in korea and dug down. he was also the senator handed the ax and cord and found
you outside. .. was a very tough irish catholic, italian catholic town from a very traditional in many ways in the first beta of hippies that came to the city really have the drawbridge pulled up on them. many of the kids can get treatment with a drug problems and other medical problems. they were given the cold shoulder by the city officials, the cops harassed them. so that was only the beginning of what became the very first culture were anything great here in san francisco. america's first culture where was the civil work in the disco is of between these new forces, social forces that began sweeping the city in the 1960s and 1970s with gays. one step work really took hold, and became quite bloody. i written about the so-called san francisco values weren't born with flowers in their hair. they were born howling. the book i should say does have a happy ending because the city ultimately trying triads. it resolves these differences after very brutal times and with the help of then mayor who is not terribly beloved in the city at first couldn't win the office because she was a little st
to observe him and how he waved his irish cult tram pride into everything that he does and he certainly does in my eyes and planted a seed of interest i look forward on the next trip to ireland -- hint hint whoever is organizing that and it has also been very beautiful to watch his relationship with his wife jennifer johnson grow it's been a privilege watch but i didn't watch michael be conceived but i did watch him grow but to know that they were two separate entities that came to be and i think the role of jennifer she was also very helpful in helping me make the transition and helping me understand the benefits and what it means to serve san francisco and how she was just very helpful in that transition and as a family as a collective unit i believe this couple is expemple player in their service ask time. last week i was leaving city hall and i said, how many ebbs do you have tonight and he said are you kidding i'm going home to have dinner with my wife and effect friend. and i said, that is beautiful i have got three toaivet go to. but that is the core that drives sean that family valu
'm -- there's a lot of work to do. supervisor elsbernd, i'll miss you. i like irish. i -- infinity with the irish people. i call them the latin-american, european latin-american, equivalent to latin-americans. i disagree with many of your decisions but i liked you. i think you're honest. >> president chiu: thank you very much. next speaker. >> good afternoon, board of supervisors. to the friends of the san francisco public library, who killed pope john paul ii, the king of pop, michael jackson, president barack h. obama, mayor willie h. brown, dr. robert c. scott at ucs sf, academic dean keith c. wingate, assistant academic dean seana marshall, legal counsel -- leop adviser jan jamison and mammoth -- a circumcised foreign student from instandbull turkey at golden gate university. between november 2008 and december 2012, was it these hands? was it alcohol? was it drinking alcohol? was it brewing alcohol? or was it tobacco? i would like to use the rest of my time to pay tribute to the fallen. >> supervisor elsbernd: thank you very much. next speaker please. >> hey, ron austin, execut
done in district seven from golf course -- to working for the irish immigration center et cetera, and i think we can probably talk for many hours about the many thing that you have done but in addition, to your expertise which i'll miss in addition, to all of your cautionnaire not to all of us on what se we shouldn't past, i'll going to say i miss how you throw a microphone, i'm going to miss the energic debates we remember with chris fail 83 and last few years with david campos and most of all, i'm going to miss working a six -years-old man trapped in a 36 -years-old body. and i know there will be many other comments that will be made along those lines but sean in all seriousness we are all going to miss you and with that, i know that there are many other colleagues that have other thing to say although i'm wondering if we should sprferl farrell, no? who wants to go next? supervisor farrell owe supervisor wiener. you go first farrell. >> so, this is a hard one i always -- i quickly learned after coming on to the board that i was going to dread the day that sean elsburnd was no longe
of cashel is one of ireland's most evocative sites. this was the seat of ancient irish kings for seven centuries. st. patrick baptized king aengus here in about 450 a.d. in around 1100, an irish king gave cashel to the church, and it grew to become the ecclesiastical capital of all ireland. 800 years ago, this monastic community was just a chapel and a round tower standing high on this bluff.
's gangnam style with a twist. the flash mob broke out saturday irish dancing gangnam style. they are part of a team of irish dance company in columbia. they look really good. i have to say i am pretty impressed. that's awesome. more so with this than the regular gangnam style because it has a twist and player. >> i like it. >> i do too. >> there they go. >> very cool. >> that's the gangnam style we know. but even for a flash mob they are more organized than you are used to seeing so annapolis mall the place to get a prettyspectacular sight with the shopping going on there. all right. so speak of shopping a. lot of people are heading out last- minute. you say bundle up especially if you are going to do outdoor shopping like in the downtown area. >> exactly. it's cold and will stay that way throughout the day. >> okay. >> and if you are going to be outside doing that take umbrella because in the afternoon, it's going to come down. >> the wintery mix. >> yes. >> parking lots are empty so that will probably change later today. >> yes. >> reporter: as everybody wakes up and realize they have t
that you could imagine and the headline of the irish times went all over the world and said woman denied termination and dies in hospital and said to the whole world that ireland stands accused of letting this woman die because the irish doctors would not perform abortion. that's not what the facts shall, the facts are starting to emerge and telling a totally different story. an irish medical expert came forward pretty much straight away, governor, explained in ireland, abortion is illegal. and to save mother's life, one of the chief of one of our biggest maternity hospitals said this case was nothing to do with abortion. it's not a treatment for septcemia and it was resistent to an antibiotic. the facts emerged and became drown in the hysteria by abortion campaigners and media and they were doing that in order to try to push abortion on ireland. >> mike: it was in part because of that newspaper headlines, and woman denied abortion and dies in the hospital. and the reporter herself admitted there wasn't really evidence, but that admission came after the publication and after the damage w
. they had so many irish they could not handle it during the famine and closed the borders and would not let any more people come to the city. eventually the irish became dominant in 19th century. in the 1875 census one 1/6 albanians was born in ireland. add to the politics that it was always a political city with dutch colonization. likewise with the drafters of the constitution gathering. it went it that way through the years. one of the great politicians of all time was the mayor of albany. from the time he was elected until he died in a hospital in 1983. "the onion book of known knowledge" terms of an interrupted the longest-running mayor of any city in the united states and he was very proud. as part of a fantastic political machine taking power away from the republicans in 21. the key figure was an irish man. the four brothers and according brothers. they founded the new democratic party and took the city back from the republicans. when they took it from 1921 they never let go. it is our succession and has been from the perpetuate years of the machine. dan o'connell died and after that
. >> especially when you're an irish catholic. you mary some guy name bruno. >> no brunos in my life. >> in show business -- yours kind of a working class guy like me. >> you have no idea. watched the show my whole life and the fact you say you're working class like me, my heart skipped a bit. >> that's true. you make it big. how do you look back? >> it takes way longer than everyone thinks, and people always say, what was your big break? it's hard to explain you have had 20 to 30 big breaks that at the time you thought was the break. >> been a great day. >> are you in or out? it's not show friend, it's show business. >> you do jerry maguire and that's the biggest break you had in your life. >> you know what i went through knowing i was going to have to fire my mentor, carrying that around in my head for a week? can you get past yourself for a second? >> you have been around for a while in the entertainment industry. i have never understood why actors, producers, directors, are so liberal generally speaking. i've had actors come up to me who say, i can't really tell people how i feel because i m
numbers of irish people and germans who are coming here because of terrible economic situations in germany. and others coming into the united states and posing a lot of problems a lot of people in the northeast, especially in terms of assimilation. a lot of those immigrants go and fight in the u.s. mexico border. the reason they do that is because they don't have opportunities economically in the united states. for the most part, they are not very good soldiers. the san patricio -- those are the deserters from the mexican war. some people think that they were irish because they carry an irish line. but the san patricio's, one can mostly say is that they were mostly catholic. one thing i did didn't talk about in the story is there is an intense tension between the catholicism of mexico and the mainstream protestant beliefs of most americans. a lot of americans actually go to mexico and think that they are going to convert catholics or regain catholicism and basically get red of the catholic thread. i was lucky enough to have a student that was a graduate student who could read german and he
of doing [unintelligible] we are underrepresented. >> i was singing of starting an irish pub. that was my idea. >> one our biggest is the corned beef and cabbage. we are asking people what they're thinking in getting some feedback. >> for a lot of people i am sure this combination looks very wrong. it might not sound right on paper but when you taste it to or have it in your mouth, it is a variety. this is one of the best ways in creating community. people gather around and talk about it and get to know different cultures. that brings people together and i hope more off the grid style and people can mingle and interact and remove all our differences and work on our similarities. this creates opportunity. >> the time has come and i am very hungry. what have you got? >> i got this from on the go, a sandwich, and a caramel cupcake. i went with home cooking. what de think? >> i will have another bite. >> sounds good. >> that was fantastic. let's start with you. >> i had the fried mac and cheese, and twinkies. i wanted to get something kind of classic with a twist on it. >> it was crispy. >> i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)

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